Clarinet Tech: Performing with iPad and iPhone

Clarinet Tech: Performing with iPad and iPhone

Having an iPad since its launch in 2010 has changed many things about the way that I work.[1] From the way that I take attendance in class, notes in meetings, reading on the go, and leaving my MacBook behind, the iPad has become an integral part of my work. Many of these tasks are administrative related, but the iPad has also influenced the way that I practice and perform.

forscore-ipad

ForScore

Soon after getting the iPad, I realized its potential as a sheet music storage device. I spent the next several months scanning all of my clarinet repertoire so that I could have all of my music with me, all of the time. ForScore was one of the first sheet music apps for the iPad and luckily it has been continually updated with great features. I still think that it is the best sheet music reader for the iPad for classical musicians.[2] I have all of my clarinet solo parts saved as PDF documents in ForScore. I can make markings as annotations, create set lists, email, print, and the page turns are faster than other readers that I have tried.

airturn

AirTurn Bluetooth Foot Pedal

Following the popularity of using an iPad for sheet music, a Colorado-based company came out with a wireless foot pedal for turning pages handsfree. AirTurn foot pedals are small devices that fit in my backpack, and can be quickly paired with my iPad for turning pages. Since the iPad screen is only big enough to show one page at a time, have a wireless foot pedal becomes critical for certain pieces. After having used this in practice and performance, I purchased a second foot pedal, and a small dock to house the two foot pedals and the wireless receiver. The second foot pedal is used for turning pages backward, which is useful for when the piece has a DC or DS repeat. It takes some practice to coordinate turning pages with your foot while playing, but once you get used to it, it is very slick. w

soundlink_mobile_nylon_bl_lg

The most recent addition to my clarinet tech arsenal is the Bose SoundLink. This compact speaker connects wireless to my iPhone over Bluetooth and I am able to perform with accompaniments or play-along recordings.[3] The SoundLink sounds great for its size; it is plenty loud and rich. With this connection in place, I can perform with anything that is loaded into the iPod app on my iPhone.

Paperless Clarinet Performance

With the above three devices, the pieces have fallen into place for me to perform with accompaniment with very little setup and equipment. A couple of months back, I was invited to give a clarinet presentation for some middle school students. I took my clarinet, iPad, iPhone, and Bose speaker. I had all of my sheet music on hand. I performed movements from the following pieces with accompaniment: Brahms Second Sonata, Poulenc Sonata, Guisganderie by JeanJean, and Gershwin’s American in Paris. The sheet music and accompaniments worked flawlessly and the students were genuinely interested in the setup. Later that same week, my wife and I performed for a wedding reception using the same setup.

At first, I only viewed these options as wonderful practice tools, but over time they have evolved into viable performance tools. It has been three short years since iPad 1 came out. I can’t wait to see what the tech future holds for the next three years.


  1. I still have a 1st generation iPad. It works fine, but is showing its age. It feels slow sometimes, but the battery life is still amazing. I plan on finally upgrading to an iPad 5 when it is announced this Fall.  ↩

  2. Another sheet music reader that I have used is GigBook. GigBook is better suited for jazz musicians because of its design for quickly creating set lists for gigs.  ↩

  3. I create some of the accompaniments using Sibelius and others I record out of SmartMusic. With SmartMusic and MIDI files, most of the piano parts are accessible for the clarinet masterworks.  ↩